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Maths Learning

Wednesday 3rd June

 

Maths - Shape lines of symmetry


Today we are going to be continuing with our shape learning but focusing on finding lines of symmetry. The images below explain what this means.

 

Starter

Look at the poster below with 2D shapes. Can you name these first? All of these have one line of symmetry drawn on already. Which shapes can you spot that would also have more than one line of symmetry? Remember that both sides must be equal, one half cannot be wider or larger than the other. 

Activity 1

Below you will find the ‘spectacular symmetry’ sheets attached. If you are able to print these, you can cut the shapes out and fold them to find lines of symmetry. Remember that you will need to be very careful with your folding to ensure that the sides match up and the halves are equal. If you cannot print, draw around some objects in your home e.g. a cup to make a circle to cut out, box for a square or rectangle or ask a grown up if they could draw some 2D shapes on to some paper for you to cut out and fold. 

You do not need to print all of the sheets out. They begin with a few shapes and then more shapes are on each page with more lines of symmetry. Choose which is best for you.

Activity 2

Now that you have folded shapes to see if they are symmetrical, you will now be having a go at drawing lines of symmetry. You may like to draw these on the shapes you have already cut out, draw some new 2D shapes to add the line of symmetry on or print the resource below. You must use a ruler and a pencil or something straight as a guide if you do not have a ruler. If you have a small mirror at home, you may like to use this to check lines of symmetry. When you have drawn your line, check that both parts are equal. If not, have another go at being more accurate. 

Tuesday 2nd June

Today we are going to continue with our shape learning; comparing 2D and 3D shapes by sorting them into groups.

 

Starter

 

Picture 1

A cuboid and a cube both have 12 edges, 8 vertices and 6 faces. So how are they different?

 

Clue: Look at their faces
 
We can find 2D shapes on the flat faces of 3D shapes. On a cube there are 6 square faces whereas a cuboid has 6 rectangular faces or 4 rectangular faces and 2 square faces.

 

Which 2D shapes can you find on the faces of a square-based pyramid?

Picture 1

Activity 1

For this activity you will need to print and cut the 2D shape cards or ask an adult if they can draw you some so you can carefully cut them out. You are going to come up with different ways of sorting the 2D shapes into groups. It is up to you how you sort them so you may have just two groups e.g. ‘squares’ and ‘not squares’ or you may have more e.g. ‘3 sides’, ‘4 sides’ and ‘5 sides’.

 

Discussion points:

  • What shapes have you got?
  • Can you name them?
  • How could you sort them?
  • How many different ways can you sort them?
Picture 1
Picture 2
As a challenge you could ask a grown up to draw some irregular 2D shapes for you to try and sort into your groups. An irregular 2D shape is where the sides aren’t all equal and aren’t always very recognisable. Here’s an example of an irregular pentagon, we know it is a pentagon because it has 5 sides.
Picture 1

Activity 2

For this activity you will be comparing a 2D shape with a 3D shape. Have a look at each question below and record what similarities and differences you can identify. Remember to try and use the mathematical terms: vertices, sides, edges and faces.
 

Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3
Picture 4

Monday 1st June

This week we are going to be learning about 2D and 3D shapes. Remember 2D shapes are flat and 3D shapes can be picked up, stacked or rolled. Today our focus will be on their properties. 


Look at the image below of 2D shapes. Can you name each of the shapes? Can you identify any of their properties?

Picture 1
Well done if you were able to use the mathematical vocabulary: sides and vertices. 
Picture 1

Now discuss with a grown up:

  • What is a 3D shape?
  • Can you name any?
  • Can you name any of their properties?

 

Here is an example of a 3D shape:
 

Picture 1
This is a cube. It has 8 vertices, 12 edges and 6 square faces.
Picture 1
 If you have any tinned foods at home, such as a tin of beans, you can feel and see that this shape has 3 faces – 2 flat and 1 curved.
Picture 1
Activity 1
Below you will find the “2D shape properties table” sheet attached. If you are able to print these you can use the pictures of the shapes to identify the properties. If you cannot print, draw around some objects in your home e.g. a cup to make a circle, a lego/duplo brick for a square or rectangle or ask a grown up if they could draw some 2D shapes on to some paper for you. Then you could list the properties next to each shape.
 
Activity 2
Now that you have identified the properties of a 2D shape, you are going to go on a shape hunt around your home and if you want, an outdoor space identifying 3D shapes and their properties. What 3D shapes can you find? Make a list of the 3D shapes you find, what the object was and the properties you can identify. Below you will find the “shape hunt sheet” and a poster of 3D shapes you could use to help remind you of the different shapes you may find. If you would like you could create your own table like Mrs Meadows has. Here is an example of a 3D shape she found in her home and how she recorded what she found:
 
Picture 1
Picture 2
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