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Maths Learning

Friday 3rd July 2020

Welcome to Recap Friday. Today, we are going to focus on recapping what we learnt about the four operations this year.

You will complete at least two tasks, be sure to choose tasks which will help you depending on where you feel you need practice.

 

Thursday 2nd July 2020

So you can identify any gaps in your learning, which can then be emailed to Miss Lines (thank you so much to those who did last week), we would like you to complete this Year 4 Arithmetic Test. The answers will be there.

Wednesday 1st July 2020

Today we are going to challenge ourselves to complete a symmetrical figure/image.

Remember, a line of symmetry reflects the image. Placing a mirror would help but I imagine, like us, you do not have a small scientific mirror at home. You must visualise reflecting the shapes on the other side.

 

Take it one square or line at a time. Match up the squares as a reflection. Here we have used coloured squares to show you where the mirrored section goes.

You can also visit this site: https://www.theschoolrun.com/what-is-symmetry for extra support - it says Year 5 but that is because it wasn’t updated with the 2013 curriculum.

Task:

Challenge:

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Tuesday 30th June 2020

Now that we are more confident on lines of symmetry and have recapped vertical and horizontal lines, let us take a look at Year 4 lines of symmetry. Why not try these questions which are similar to yesterday?

For your task, try these fluency questions. There are three levels of challenge the red star is mild, blue star is hot and orange star is spicy. 

The answers are in the document and there is also the option to complete an extended challenge (which also has three levels of challenge) by opening the second challenge document.

Monday 29th June 2020

For the beginning half of this week, we are going to focus on lines of symmetry. Our main goal today is to understand finding the lines of symmetry of a shape.

First we need to ensure we know what is meant by horizontal and vertical as well as perpendicular and parallel.

An easy way to remember horizontal is that it has the word horizon on it. Can you find any of these types of lines in your house? Miss Lines found a horizontal line of the table and a vertical line on her cow painting.

Now moving our focus onto lines of symmetry.

Here is a reminder of lines of symmetry.

 

Let us discuss how to answer this question.

 

 

First thing we need to do is remind ourselves what vertical means. Vertical is a line that goes up and down. A line of symmetry is a line which splits a shape/image exactly in half and each side is a mirror image of the other.

The first shape must be directly from the top to the bottom as when it is folded over, it will match.

 

Can you find the vertical lines of symmetry in the other three images? What about the horizontal? Would it still be a line of symmetry if we rotated the image?

Task:

 

Challenge:

Friday 26th June 2020

Welcome to Recap Friday. Today, we are going to focus on recapping what we learnt about Place Value this year.

You will complete at least two tasks, be sure to choose tasks which will help you depending on where you feel you need practice.

Thursday 25th June 2020

So you can identify any gaps in your learning, which can then be emailed to Miss Lines, we would like you to complete this Year 4 Reasoning Test A and if you have time Test B. The answers will be there.

Wednesday 24th June 2020

After learning all about triangles and their properties yesterday, we are going to focus on quadrilaterals today.

What is a quadrilateral?  Does the word ‘quad’ give you any clues? What about quadbike?

You could also watch this video to help you learn the different types of quadrilaterals and their properties: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMkY_uIku9Q

Now that we know the different types, if you can, try this quadrilateral game: https://www.iknowit.com/lessons/d-geometry-quadrilaterals.html

Task:

Challenge activity:

 

Tuesday 23rd June 2020

Last week, when talking about angles, some different types of triangle were mentioned. Can you remember any of those?

First, I want to remind you about polygons.

Now that you’ve been reminded about the definition of polygons. Why not watch this video and see if it jogs your memory of triangles?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4rySgvfDQU

Our focus today is going to be on triangles.

Using the guidance above, can you work out which triangle is which?

 

How did you do?

HINT: There is one equilateral triangle, three scalene and one isosceles.

 

Task 1 – Either discuss with an adult or write down some ideas yourself. Be imaginative, if you can provide evidence then it is TRUE!

 

Example: One triangle has two equal sides, the other does not.

 

Task 2 – Try to draw some triangles yourself.

Using a ruler, draw a scalene, right angled, isosceles and equilateral.

Which did you find trickiest?

 

Challenge task:

 

 

Monday 22nd June 2020

As a bit of fun and a way to celebrate what would have been Active Week at school, we are going to try the 2016 Olympic Maths Challenge Cards. They will be available for download if you would rather print them and the answers will be in a separate document.

Friday 19th June 2020

Today, we are going to cement our learning by trying some mastery questions. Reminder, the questions gradually increase in difficulty with the first page being the easiest.

Feel free to go back and rewatch the videos or play the games from the last two days to support your knowledge.

Thursday 18th June 2020

Today, we are going to focus on comparing and ordering angles. You will need to be able to order angles in ascending and descending order.

 

If angles are written in ascending order then it goes from smallest to largest. If angles are written in descending order then it goes from largest to smallest.

 

We can use Miss Lines’s angle checker 5000, available at all good stores, to see which angles are bigger than others. (Remember this is a piece of paper!)

We will work out the triangle together then you can try the other two.

This is not an equilateral triangle so the angles are different. It is an isosceles triangle so the bottom two are the same. Using the Angle Checker 5000, we can see that the bottom two are smaller than the top one. Therefore the top angle is the biggest.

Now it is your turn, circle the largest angle in the green quadrilateral and diagram.

 

Questions to discuss with an adult or to consider

Task 1 –

Task 2 –

Challenge task-

 

 

Wednesday 17th June 2020

We are now going to shift our focus on to properties of shape (geometry).

Take a look at this Knowledge Organiser to remind yourself of what you may already know.

Today, we are going to see if we can identify angles. How can we tell different angles apart?

Here are two videos which can remind you about the different angles. Why not grab two sticks or other straight items to create the angles?

https://youtu.be/e3cADrFfXoU

https://youtu.be/Ld6lgwssZys

 

Why not try this game? http://www.snappymaths.com/other/shapeandspace/angles/interactive/acuterightobtuse/acuterightobtuse.htm

 

Using this information, let us work identify the angles shown below.

A corner of a piece of paper is a right angle (90oC) so we can use this to identify angles. Place the corner of the paper on the point where the two lines meet and then one side against the line.

See this video as an example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTU-dm-z0Q8&feature=youtu.be

If you do this, you should be able to see part of the angle in the first one, meaning it is larger than 90oC. As it does not turn back on itself, it must be an obtuse angle.

 

Task 1 – work out the rest of the given angles, feel free to use the paper trick as you should be able to hold the paper up to the screen.

Task 2 – Now try these ones

Challenge task:

 

Tuesday 16th June 2020

Today, we are going to wrap up our learning about line graphs and statistics by trying some mastery questions. Reminder, the questions gradually increase in difficulty with the first page being the easiest.

If you need some extra guidance on statistics, then please watch/read through these resources:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rODh9iHeb7Y

https://www.theschoolrun.com/data-handling

 

Monday 15th June 2020

For part of this week, we are going to continue to focus on statistics.

As it has been a whole weekend, here is the Knowledge Organiser for you to remind yourself of your learning so far.

Here is a quick starter task to get you thinking about line graphs.

Let us take a look at this line graph and focus on how to answer these questions.

To work out the first sentence, we take it a month at the time. Go along the x-axis(bottom) and reach 1. When you reach 1 months, go up until you meet the mark then across until you hit the y-axis(left numbers). Using this method, we can see:

When the puppy is 1 months old the weight is 2kg.

When the puppy is 2 months old the weight is 4kg.

When the puppy is 3 months old the weight is 10kg.

When the puppy is 4 months old the weight is 16kg.

The next sentence is asking us to choose two months and then find the difference between them. I will show you two examples.

Between month 1 and month 4, the puppy increased by 14kg. (16kg-2kg=14kg)

Between month 2 and month 3, the puppy increased 6kg. (10kg-4kg=6kg)

 

Now take a look at answering these questions for yourself. (You may wish to use a ruler to find the correct places on the axes.

 

Challenge questions:

 

 

Friday 12th June 2020

Today, we are going to shift our focus to line graphs.

Let us take another look at the Knowledge Organiser – in particular – the Line Graph section.

Input

A line graph is a continuous graph and you will, on occasion, be asked to work out something not on a line. For example, what is the temperature in Borneo in the middle of July. To answer this, I would have to find half way between July and August and see what the temperature is there. (A ruler is helpful!) In the middle of July, the average temperature is 29.5oC.

This line graph shows the temperature on a playground at different times of the day. It is asking us to find the temperature at 9am. To do this, we go along the x-axis (bottom) until we get to 9am and then draw a line to the marked point.

 

Then you draw a line to the y-axis (side).

 

This shows us that the temperature at 9am is 4oC (chilly!)

The next question is asking what the warmest time of the morning is…

To answer this, we find the highest marked point and then draw a line down to the time.

This shows that the warmest time of the morning is 12 noon.

Now try these tasks yourself –

Challenge tasks –

Thursday 11th June 2020

Today, we will be focusing on comparison, sum and difference of data presented in charts.

Input –

 

This pictogram is showing how many points each team has, it shows that a full circle is 20 points. This means a half circle (see Sycamore) would be 10 points because half of 20 is 10. A quarter circle (see Beech) would be 5 and three quarter circle (see Oak and Ash) would be 15.

The easiest first step would be to work out how many points each team has achieved.

Sycamore has 3 whole circles which is 3 x 20 = 60 and then add on the half circle 60+10=70. Therefore, Sycamore has 70 points.

Oak has 3 whole circles and three quarters of a circle which is 3 x 20 + 15 = 75. Therefore, Oak has 75.

Beech has 3 whole circles and a quarter which is 3 x 20 + 5 = 65. Therefore, Beech has 65.

Ash has 2 full circles and three quarters which is 2 x 20 +15 = 55. Therefore, Ash has 55.

 

Now we can look at the questions. The first one asks us How many MORE points does the Sycamore team have than the Ash team? This means we need to work out the difference between Sycamore and Ash. Sycamore has 70 and Ash has 55. 70 – 55 = 15. Therefore, Sycamore has 15 more points than Ash.

The next question asked is How many points do Beech and Oak teams have altogether? This means we need to add the two numbers together – altogether means addition. Beech has 65 and Oak has 75. 65+75=140. Therefore, Beech and Oak have 140 points altogether.

The last question asks us How many more points does Ash need to be equal to Oak?  This is another find the difference question. Ash has 55 and Oak has 75. 75 – 55 is 20. Therefore, Ash needs 20 more points to be equal to Oak.

Task 1 – Now try these questions yourself.

 

 

Challenge task –

Wednesday 10th June 2020

For the rest of this week, we are going to focus on statistics. This does not mean saying 1 in 10 cows are black and white but also includes being able to interpret graphs and explain what a graph is showing.

Have a look at this Knowledge Organiser to remind yourself of some statistics ‘must knows’. Some you may have not seen before but we will be sure to cover it in the coming lessons.

Today, we are going to look at interpreting charts. Interpreting means to explain the meaning of something so when talking about graphs, you explain what the graph means/shows.

When creating a graph, it is important to use the most appropriate scale. This means, for example, not counting up in 100s if the data you are showing is 3, 6, 7, 9, 3, 12.

Take a look at the videos on this page to help explain this further.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z7rcwmn/articles/z8dp8mn

To answer this question, we need to look at what numbers the bars reach on the left. For example, if I follow the top of the ‘car’ bar then I can see it is on the 12 line. Therefore 12 children use a car for transport.

Task 1 -

Can you complete the other three?

Challenge – Which is the most popular way of getting to school?

What is the least popular way of getting to school?

How many children in Year 4 are there according to the chart?

 

Task 2 – Your second task is to collect some data using a tally chart to put in your own bar chart. If you do not have enough people to ask then feel free to imagine some numbers.

Here are some examples of tally charts that you may wish to use to inspire your own bar chart.

 

 

Once you have your tally chart, you need to present it in a bar chart just like the one we answered questions on above. Here are some more examples -:

 

There will be printable squared paper on this page if required.

 

Challenge – Create some questions for an adult (or Miss Lines to answer if you email her your work) about your graph. Example – Which is the most popular take away in my house?

Tuesday 9th June 2020

Today we are going to recap on dividing by 10 and 100.

In a similar way to yesterday, it is easier to use a place value chart but this time move all the digits right one place value for dividing by 10 and two place values for dividing by 100.

 


 

 

You do not need the 0s as there are no numbers after them.

Challenge – What would happen if you had a decimal?

Example 18.4÷10? Use the place value chart to help you.

If you wish for some further help and explanation then follow this link and watch the video - https://www.pembrokedockcommunityschool.co.uk/divide-by-10-100-and-1000/

Task 1 – Try these ones for yourself

 

Now try these questions using all you have recapped

Example: 8 x 20 = 8 x 2 x 10 = 16 x 10 = 160

840 ÷ 40 = 840  ÷ 4  ÷ 10 = 210  ÷ 10 = 21

 

  1. 42 x 30 =
  2. 53 x 40 =
  3. 29 x 50 =
  4. 880 ÷ 20 =
  5. 560 ÷ 90 =
  6. 240  ÷ 60 =

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday 8th June 2020

Today, we are going to recap multiplying by 10 and 100 then applying it to multiples of ten.

To start, use this knowledge organiser to remind yourself of some multiplication facts, paying particular attention to the top right box.

The easiest way to multiply by 10 or 100 is to move all of the number one place value to the left for x10 and two place values to the left for x100.

 


 

 



If you need some further guidance or explanation then follow this link to watch a video explanation - https://www.pembrokedockcommunityschool.co.uk/multiplying-and-dividing-by-10-and-100-1/

Task 1 – Try these ones for yourself

Task 2 – Similar to these mastery questions last week, they gradually become trickier so do not panic if you find some particularly challenging.

See attached document.

 

After some feedback, we will attach all of this onto a word document to help those struggling to read it. We hope this helps.

Friday 5th June 2020

 

Time is always a tricky one to teach as there are so many different concepts, so to sum up the week there will be a range of activities that you must choose from depending on what you have found tricky this week. Think carefully back to this week....what did you fine easy? What did you find hard? If you struggle to tell the time when looking at an analogue clock then use the activities from that area. If you can easily tell the time then do not worry with those activities. The other activities then move onto telling the time digitally. You do NOT have to complete all activities from each section.

 

Telling the time activities

a) Watch this video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrxZWNu72WI

b) Play this game - https://mathsframe.co.uk/en/resources/resource/116/telling-the-time

c) Try this page - https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zhk82hv/articles/zcmdwxs

d) Using a clock at home, tell the time throughout the day.

 

Analogue to digital - 12 hours

a) Take a look at the Knowledge Organise document below

b) Try this game (will not work on IPad) - http://flash.topmarks.co.uk/2445

b) Try the Diving into Mastery Questions document below (12 hours one)

 

 

Analogue to digital - 24 hours

a) Try this page - https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zkfycdm/articles/zcrmqty

b)  Watch this video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72MmggC_ZtA

c) Try the Diving into Mastery Questions document below (24 hours one)

 

Thursday 4th June 2020

Today we are going to focus on converting between analogue and digital within the 24-hour clock!

As you can see on the clock above, a day starts at 00:00 (12:00am or midnight). It moves around the time until 12:00 (12:00pm or midday) then it changes to 13:00(1pm).

Miss Lines’ tip for finding the 24 hour digital time is to add 12! For example, if you are asked to write 5:30pm in 24 hour clock then you just add 12 to the 5 so 5:30pm = 17:30.

You do NOT need to write am or pm after the 24 hour clock version.

 

Task 1 -

Task 2 -

Challenge task –

 

Wednesday 3rd June 2020

 

Today our focus is going to be on converting between analogue and digital using the 12 hour clock. You will have learnt this before in Year 3. Here is a little reminder. Can you explain the similarities and differences between the two? 

 

 

Starter activity-

Check with an adult that you have these correct.

 

If you need more help with understanding this have a go making different times...today you only need to work on the 12 hour clock not 24 hours: 

https://www.topmarks.co.uk/time/teaching-clock

 

You can then play this game: 

 https://mathsframe.co.uk/en/resources/resource/116/telling-the-time

 

Now try these questions:

 

 

 

 

 

Challenge task –

Tuesday 2nd June 2020

Today, we are going to focus on days, weeks, months and years.

Starter activity –

 

Check with an adult that you have completed these correctly!

First task – Answer these questions:

Task 2: Try your hand at these reasoning problems!

 

Monday 1st June 2020

Welcome back! This week our learning is about time with a focus on recapping our knowledge of hours, minutes and seconds today.

Starter activity –

 

Check with an adult that you are correct!

Let us refresh our memory on units of time.

 

 

Task 1: Using this recapped information, answer these questions:

Task 2: Using the downloadable booklet, or the images, answer the questions. The questions become increasingly more challenging as you change page. The last page is the most difficult but I am sure you can rise to the challenge if you so choose to do so!

Friday 22nd May 2020

As today is Ancient Greek Day, we are going to focus on times tables.

Below are some times tables sheets with an Ancient Greek theme but feel free to use TTRockstars, MathsShed or any other times table practising method.

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