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Maths Learning

Wednesday 3rd June

 

Today in Maths we would like you to work on converting Improper into Mixed Fractions and vice versa.  Below is a mixture of practical, on-screen and off-screen activities. Please complete at least one of these, but feel free to do them all!

Yesterday we looked at improper and mixed fractions

Discussion points –

  • Is 1 6/8  the same as 7/4  ?  How do you know?
  • Can you explain how to convert improper into mixed fractions?
  • Can you explain how to convert mixed fractions into improper fractions?

 

You could re-watch this White Rose video on converting improper into mixed fractions and vice versa if you feel you need to, but this is the same video as yesterday.  We are going to be looking at converting mixed to improper fractions: 

https://vimeo.com/415436982

 

Activity 1

Have a go at this worksheet and then check your answers.  Do questions 1 to 5 and have a go at question 6 if you would like to set yourself a challenge.   

 

Activity 2 

You will need:

  • Plain paper
  • Pens and pencils

Draw a poster to explain how to change mixed to improper fractions and vice versa.  Imagine that you are explaining to Year Four.

Here are a couple of examples to show you the sort of things that you might include:

 

 

Activity 3

Have a go at this online game:

https://www.education.com/games/mixed-numbers-and-improper-fractions/

You can have a go at all three levels.

Tuesday 2nd June

Today in Maths we would like you to work on converting Improper into Mixed Fractions and vice versa.  Below is a mixture of practical, on-screen and off-screen activities. Please complete at least one of these, but feel free to do them all!

Here is a quick recap of what improper fraction means:

  

And a mixed fraction:

  

Discussion points –

  • Explain to someone else in your family what mixed fraction means. 
  • Now explain what an improper fraction is. 
  • Which number is the denominator in a fraction?
  • Which number is the numerator in a fraction?

Watch this White Rose video on converting improper into mixed fractions and vice versa.  This is from Week 4, lesson 3. 

https://vimeo.com/415436982

 

Activity 1

Have a go at this worksheet and then check your answers .  Do questions 1 to 5 and have a go at 6 and 7 if you would like to challenge yourself. 

 

Activity 2 

You will need:

  • A deck of cards (with all the picture cards and aces removed)
  • A strip of card or a ruler

If you haven’t got a deck of cards, you could write numbers 2 – 9 on some post its or scraps of paper

 

Shuffle the deck and place face down. 

Turn over the top two cards. 

Place the larger one on top to make an improper fraction

    

Write it down onto squared paper and then convert it to a mixed fraction. 

Repeat until you have done this ten times.

 

If you would like to challenge yourself, then take three cards at a time:

    

 

Activity 3

Have a go at  this online game:

https://www.sheppardsoftware.com/mathgames/fractions/mathman_improper_fractions.htm

You will need to enable flash player

Monday 1st June

Today in Maths we are going to recap our work on equivalent fractions.  Below is a mixture of practical, on-screen and off-screen activities. Please complete at least one of these, but feel free to do them all!l

Discussion points -

  • What does equivalent mean?
  • How can you check that a fraction is equivalent?
  • What does denominator mean?
  • What does numerator mean?

 

We are going to work on White Rose , Week 4, lesson 2.  Watch this video:  https://vimeo.com/415436912

 

Activity 1:

Have a go at this worksheet.  

Have a go at questions 1 - 4, but questions 5 and 6 are more challenging and should really get your  brains working! 

 

 

 

Activity 2:

Make some posters of equivalent fractions! 

You will need:

  • paper
  • pen
  • a timer or stopwatch

Watch this video of Miss Bufton explaining how to find some equivalent fractions. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD3ZoMZb7NM&feature=youtu.be

Choose one of these fractions as a starting point and then time yourself.  How many equivalent fractions can you find in 5 minutes?  Try again with a different starting fraction!

3/4

5/6

2/3

6/8

1/10

 

Activity 3:

Have a go at this online game:  https://www.splashlearn.com/equivalent-fractions-games

Friday 22nd May

 

Today in Maths we would like you to work on mirror reflections.  Below is a mixture of practical, on-screen and off-screen activities. Please complete at least one of these, but feel free to do them all!l

Discussion points -

  • Look in a mirror and see what happens when you close one eye, look one direction, bring one hand to your nose, etc. 
  • When you mirror something, what changes about the image?
  • Is it exactly the same? 

 

Today, it might really help you if you can find a small mirror to check your work.  

 

 

 

 

Look at the answers!  Were you right?

 

  

Activity 1

Choose one of these worksheets and have a go. On the Mild Challenge, you need to carefully draw on the mirror shape and check your work with a mirror.  

If you choose the Reflection Worksheet, do numbers 1 - 4.  Question 5 is a challenge question.  

You can check your answers when you have finished!

Activity 2 

Use a piece of squared paper.  You need to draw a line down the middle of the paper and you are then going to create a symmetrical pattern.  Here is an example:

 

If you are stuck for ideas, you could copy and complete these patterns:

 

 

 

You can check your work with a small mirror.  Do the two sides mirror each other?

 

Activity 3

https://mathsframe.co.uk/en/resources/resource/82  Click on the square and drag it to where you would like to place it.  You can do your own symmetrical pattern online.

OR  use TTRS

OR choose any area of Maths Shed

Today in Maths we would are going to do some nature based maths!.  Below is a mixture of practical, on-screen and off-screen activities. Please complete at least one of these, but feel free to do them all!

 

Activity 1

Have a go at these worksheets.  You are going to try to complete these symmetrical shapes from nature.  You need to look very closely and work carefully to make your end results as accurate as possible!

 

 

Activity 2 

You will need:

  • A selection of natural objects - leaves/flowers/stones  (2 of each)
  • Ruler
  • Chalk or wool/string
  • Paper and pens

Yesterday we worked on co-ordinates.  Today you are going to make your own grid outside. 

Either - use chalk to draw out a grid on your patio or driveway 

Or -   cut lots of pieces of string or wool the same length and lay them out in a grid. 

 

Take your pairs of objects. 

Place one on the grid you have created

Under the the heading KEY, place its partner and write down its co-ordinates.   Remember, like yesterday, to go ALONG the corridor and UP the stairs!

Take a picture of your work!

 

Here is a picture of a string grid laid out and the first couple of objects plotted.  

 

Activity 3

Go on to Maths Shed and practise your number bonds to 100. 

OR go on to Times Table Rock Stars and work on your speed!

 

Activity 2

  1. Find the emojis

You will need:  squared paper

On the squared paper, draw up a co-ordinate grid that is 10 by 10.  It should look like this:

 

Now try to plot these points.  As you plot each point, you will need to use a ruler to join it to the point before. 

When the instructions start a new line, you start a new shape. 

Can you work out the emojis?  Answers will be right at the bottom of this page!

EMOJI 1

EMOJI 2

EMOJI 3

 

OR: 

  • Draw your own picture using the straight lines on your grid.
  • Write down all the co-ordinates  
  • Ask a partner to plot them all or send them to your teacher. 

Does their picture look like yours?

 

 

Activity 3

Try this online co-ordinates game. 

mathsisfun.com/data/click-coordinate.html

Have a go at beginner level, then try easy and medium!

 

You could also try this one:

https://mathsframe.co.uk/en/resources/resource/469/Coordinates-Alien-Attack

but make sure that when you start you choose “the first quadrant.”

 

Emoji Answers:

Tuesday 19th May

Today in Maths we would like you to work on identifying different types of angles.  Below is a mixture of practical, on-screen and off-screen activities. Please complete at least one of these, but feel free to do them all!

Discussion Points:

  • How many degrees are there in a right angle?
  • So how many degrees are there in half a right angle?

Begin by watching this very short video.  Have a go at the learn, test and revise sections.

http://www.skoool.com.eg/english/skoool_bundle/content/secondary/maths/angle_types/index.html

 

 

 

 

Answers:

Activity 1:

​​​​​​Have a go at these worksheets -

 

Activity 2:

Look at this picture:

Answers:

 

Now use a ruler to write your name .  You can only use straight lines. 

  • How many acute angles are there? 
  • How many obtuse? 
  • Are there any right angles?

Send us a picture!

 

Activity 3:

Have a go at these online games - for this one you will need to think carefully what a right angle would look like (90 degrees).  What would half a right angle look like (45 degrees?)

Practise counting up in 45s:  45, 90, 135, 180 etc.

http://flash.topmarks.co.uk/4772

You could also try this game.  Ycu will need to enable flash player.  Focus on the first and second levels.

https://www.topmarks.co.uk/Flash.aspx?a=activity16

Monday 18th May

 

Today we are going to be looking at angles and degrees of turn.   Below is a choice of 3 different activities:  a worksheet based approach, and 2 practical activities today.  You can choose which you would like to do, but as always, feel free to choose more than one activity.  Do all of them if you feel like it!

Discussion points –

  • What is an angle? 
  • What does a 90 degree angle look like?
  • How might your 9 times table come in useful

The first 4 multiples in the 9 x table are 9, 18, 27 and 36. Can you use these to help you work out your 90 times table?

These will come in useful!

  • Now stand up and face the window.  Turn slowly on the spot until you have made a complete turn and are back where you have started.  You have made a full turn and turned through 360 degrees.  
  • Now, starting in the same place, make a half turn.  You should end up facing the opposite direction.  You have turned 180 degrees.  
  • Now, starting in the same place, make a quarter turn.  You have turned through 90 degrees.  

Remember that you can turn CLOCKWISE (in the same direction as the hands of the clock travel) or ANTI CLOCKWISE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity 1

Have a go at this White Rose worksheet.  You will need to think carefully about clockwise and anti clockwise!  

Do questions 1 - 5, but if you would like a challenge, have a go at questions 6 and 7!

Use the answer sheet to check through your work once you have finished.  

Activity 2:

  • You will need: 
  • a large piece of paper
  • wool/string 
  • paints and a paintbrush/felt pens

You are going to produce a masterpiece!

Tie the wool/string to a pen or paintbrush.  You need to find the middle of your piece of paper and make a mark.

You are going to be using the pen/string to draw circles.  

  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtqBrtqWN9E

Use this method to make a picture or pattern using full turns, half turns or quarter turns.  Think carefully about whether you are going clockwise or anticlockwise.  

If you wanted to, you could write a list of instructions so that somebody else could copy your pattern!

 

Activity 3:

You will need: 

  • a variety of objects to create an obstacle course
  • a blindfold  
  • a partner!

Carefully plan out your obstacle course.  You or your partner need to be to follow instructions to weave around the objects without touching/bumping into them.  

Once your course is laid out .....

*check with an adult, just to make sure that there are no safety hazards!*

 

One of you must be blindfolded. 

Can you give/follow instructions to get safely from one end to the other, moving around the obstacles?

You can only use these instructions:

- Move forward.... steps 

- Move backward..... steps

- Turn 90/ 180/ 270/ 360 degrees

- make a quarter turn

-make a half turn

- clockwise

- anti clockwise

- stop!

 

Maths - Friday 15th May

Here are the answers for yesterday's work.  Well done if you worked these all out!

Today you have three options. 

  • You could try the Friday Challenge from the White Rose Maths Home Learning Site.    Look for Summer Term, Week 4.  

         The most suitable questions for Year 5 are 1 to 5. But why don’t you work with your family on the rest of the problems. Do as many

         as you can! Help each other out.

         https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/

You can download these from the website or use these links:

  • Work on TTRS.  Try to beat your own speed record - you can do it!
  • Work on Maths Shed.  Spend at least twenty minutes working on the number bonds - start with the 2 digits and work your way up!  Again, it's all about speed!

Maths - Thursday 14th May

Some of you have found the balanced calculations on last week's 5 A Day tricky, so we are going to look at some of these today and go back to the absolute basics.  Read through these slides to remind yourself how these work.  

Then, below is a mixture of practical, on-screen and off-screen activities. Please complete at least one of these, but feel free to do them all!

Discussion points –

  • How do you make something balance?
  • Where do you start with a balanced calculation?  Which side do you know/can you work out?

2+2 is the same as 4

Sometimes a balanced calculation is a two step process.  You need to begin by working out the side where you have all the information and facts.  Then you can work out the missing number:  e.g.

 

We know that 2+4 = 6, so we need to find out what we need to add to 3 on the other side to make the calculation balance.  

 

Activity 1

Pick your level of challenge:

Activity 2

You will need:  a deck of card with all the picture cards removed

                          some post-its or scraps of paper

You can play this game by yourself or race a partner to get a balanced calculation first!

  • Shuffle the cards well. 
  • Use the post-its to write =, 2 lots of + and 2 lots of -.  For an extra challenge, include x and a division sign.
  • Deal the top 6 cards.  

  • Can you use the cards to make a balanced calculation?  Here two examples made with these cards.  You can make it as easy or as challenging as you like!

FIRST OPTION

SECOND OPTION

 

Activity 3:

Go on to Maths Shed and practise your number bonds.  Begin with 2 digits and then move up to 3 or 4.  

The more you practise your calculation skills, the easier these will be!

 

MATHS - Wednesday 13th May

 

Today we are going to be revising our work on area.  Watch the clip below to remind you what area is:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zjbg87h/articles/zwqt6fr

Then watch this White Rose video:

https://vimeo.com/415436807

Discussion points –

  • What is the difference between area and perimeter
  • How do you find the area of a rectangle?

 

Activity 1

Have a go at these questions on the White Rose worksheets.  Go up to question 6.  For question 6, instead of drawing areas that are 24 cm squared, use your squared paper and just draw areas of 24 squares instead! 

Questions 7 and 8 are challenge questions!

Activity 2 

You will need:  squared paper and a ruler.  If you choose the second activity, you will also need five coloured pens or pencils.

  • Use a piece of squared paper and a ruler.  How many shapes can you draw that have an area of 20 squares?  Let your teacher know how many you found, or send them a photo of your work!

  OR      

  •  Use a piece of squared paper and 5 different coloured pencils or felt pens. 

         Using all five colours, make up a pattern using squares and rectangles only.  

         When you have finished, work out the areas of each colour.  Instead of counting each and every square and rectangle, can you find a 

         quicker/easier way to work them out?

Activity 3

Either try this mild challenge:  

https://toytheater.com/area-climber/

OR

Go on to Times Tables Rock Stars and practise your multiplication knowledge.  The quicker and the faster you are, the easier it will be to calculate the area of a rectangle!

MATHS - Tuesday 12th May

 

Today we are going to be revising last term’s learning on perimeter just to keep our skills sharp!  Below is a mixture of two practical options and a worksheet based approach.  Please complete at least one of these, but feel free to do them all!

Discussion points –

  • What is perimeter? 
  • When might you need to work out the perimeter of something in a real life situation?
  • What type of calculation do you have to do in order to find the perimeter of a shape?

 

Activity 1

Go to the White Rose website and look at Summer Term, Week 3, lesson 4. 

https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/

Watch the video.

You may not be able download the worksheet and answers directly from the site anymore, in which case, you can use the documents below:   You can use the answers to check your work through when you have finished.   

 

Activity 2

Have a go at drawing out a shape with a specific perimeter. 

You will need:  a ruler and chalk and some outside space

                    Or  pencil and large paper

  • Take some chalk outside and draw on the patio/driveway (IF you have permission), trying to draw as many shapes as possible with the same perimeter e.g. 48 cm.  You could always do this with a large piece of paper and pencil if you have no chalk. 

You can change the measurement depending on how much room/paper you have!

Activity 3

Have a go at playing the perimeter game.  

You will need: two dice (or you can throw the same one twice), some squared paper and some coloured felt pens or pencils.

  • Each player chooses a colour pencil or felt pen that they will use in the game.
  • Throw the dice to see who starts. 
  • Plays take turns rolling the dice, using the numbers that they rolled to draw the perimeter of a rectangle or square . 
  • The game ends when players run out of room to draw and the winner is the player who has used the most squares. 

MATHS - Monday 11th May

Today, we are going to revise division with remainders.  Below is a mixture of practical, on-screen and off-screen activities. Please complete at least one of these, but feel free to do them all!

Discussion points –

  • What is a remainder?
  • When might we need to round remainders up?
  • When might we need to round remainders down?

 

Activity 1

Have a look at the White Rose Home learning page.  You will need to find Summer Term, Week 3, lesson 3:  Divide with Remainders

https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/

Watch the short video first, then have a go at the worksheet.  Once you have finished, you can check through your work with the answers on the website.  

If you can no longer access these resources for free, then please scroll down to the bottom of this section, where you will find the document links. 

 

Activity 2 

You will need:

  • 3 dice (or you can throw the same dice three times)
  • pencil and paper

Roll the three dice.

Decide on the division problem that gives you the highest possible answer (rounded to the nearest whole number).

You get 10 bonus points if there’s no remainder!

e.g.  

 

Here is a multiplication grid to help you with your division facts if you need it.

 

You can find a printable one at https://www.math-salamanders.com/image-files/multiplication-chart-times-tables-to-12x12-1col.gif if you prefer

 

 

Activity 3:

Mild:  have a go at Demolition Division.  Use your knowledge of division facts and the screen arrows to shoot the correct calculation tanks.  

https://www.arcademics.com/games/demolition

Spicy.Hot:  have a go at this "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" style game.

http://www.math-play.com/Division-Millionaire/division-millionaire-game_html5.html

MATHS - Thursday 7th May

Today, we are going to practise subtraction of decimals where there may be a different number of decimal places. Below is a mixture of practical, on-screen and off-screen activities. Please complete at least one of these, but feel free to do them all!

Discussion points –

  • Like yesterday, we have to put zeros in as place holders if there is a gap in one of the columns.  Why is this?
  • What is the inverse of subtraction?  Can you use this to check your answers?

 

Activity 1

Have a look at the White Rose Home learning page.  You will need to find Summer Term, Week 2, lesson 4:  subtracting decimals with different numbers of decimal places:

https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/

Watch the short video first, then have a go at the worksheet.  Once you have finished, you can check  with the answers on the website.  

 

Activity 2 

You will need:

a deck of cards with all the picture cards and tens removed

2 circular objects (bottle lids, counters, coasters, anything you can find!)

  • Take the deck of cards and shuffle well.  
  • Place the deck face down.  
  • Now you are going to turn up the top 5 cards and use them to make 2 decimal numbers. 
  • Subtract the smaller number from the larger.
  • Just remember that where there are gaps in columns, you will need to put in a zero as a place holder.

Here are some pictures to show you what we mean! 

 

 

 

Activity 3

Have a go at this online game.  You can play by yourself or with up to 4 players. 

This is the same game as yesterday, but look at the subtraction section this time. 

You have to pick an avatar and then click on 100 to start the first question.

Today, we have remembered to put the link on!

http://www.math-play.com/Decimals-Jeopardy/decimals-jeopardy-game_html5.html

Answers for Tuesday 5th May's Maths

Answers for Tuesday 5th May's Maths 1

MATHS - Wednesday 6th May

 

Today in Maths we would like you to work on adding decimals with a different number of decimal places.  As usual, below is a mixture of practical, on-screen and off-screen activities. Please complete at least one of these, but feel free to do them all!

 

Discussion points –

  • What does an empty place in a column stand for?
  • How can you make sure that you work efficiently and accurately?
  • How can you check your own work?

 

Activity 1

Have a go at the White Rose lesson, Summer Term, Week 2, lesson 3 - Adding decimals with different place value.  Watch the video and then try the worksheet. 

https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-5/

 

 

Activity 2 

Take a deck of cards and shuffle it up.  Remove all the picture cards.   The Aces will count as 1. Place the deck face down.   Find two circular objects to act as the decimal points.  These could be lids, counters, coasters – anything circular that you can find!

 

Now you are going to turn up the top 5 cards and use them to make 2 decimal numbers.  You are going to subtract the smaller number from the larger.

OOPS!  This should have said ADD the two numbers together, but if you have already completed subtraction work then don't worry, you are ahead of the game!

Just remember that where there are gaps in columns, you will need to put in a zero as a pace holder.

Here is a picture to show you what we mean!   

 

If you want to challenge yourself, pick up 7 cards, or even 9!

Activity 3

Have a go at this online game.  You can play by yourself or with up to 4 players. 

Have a go at the addition section (you have to pick an avatar and then click on 100 to start the first question.)

http://www.math-play.com/Decimals-Jeopardy/decimals-jeopardy-game_html5.html

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